Light My Fire by Young Holt Unlimited

 
Young Holt Unlimited are better know for the instrumental, Soulful Strut. They tried to bring some soul to Light My Fire. You be the judge.

Light My Fire by Ebony Rhythm Band


What if Booker T. and the M.G.'s and Carlos Santana's group showed up one day on stage without both Booker T. and Carlos. You would get the Ebony Rhythm Band.  ERB does their best with this sparkless version of Light My Fire.

Light My Fire by The Jades


Light My Fire crossed the border across Canada and got translated in French to "Moi Je T'aime Bien Comme Ca" by The Jades who left Light My Fire more jaded than anything. Not much is known about The Jades from Montreal. The group began their career singing in English in 1964 than in 1968 rebooted themselves by recording in French and faded into obscurity.  The group was comprised of Jean Beaulne, Bob Lawrence and the mysterious G. Brown ( Gilles Brown) who gets a writing credit along with The Doors.

Light My Fire by Amii Stewart


Light My Fire was ablaze with Amii Stewart's disco version of the song in 1979. Disco was on its last legs on the dance floor.  1979 marked the year they were burning disco records.  Perhaps many of Amii's records were in the heap. Not much is remembered for this version. It is more like a cover of a cover.  It sounds more like José Feliciano than The Doors.


Light My Fire by José Feliciano


José Feliciano made a career out of covering Light My Fire. Robby Krieger credits him for making the fortunes of the group grow even bigger. It's not every time a cover song surpasses the original or comes close in charting as high as the original. José's cover will always be the king of the hill to over throw.  It was a blessing but also a burden for José. The song reached number one with The Doors the previous year in 1967 and one year later José had the song chart at number three. The longevity of Light My Fire has many legs of success since 1967.  Seems everybody wants to take a stab at peaking higher than José.

Light My Fire by Train


The Doors Stoned Inmaculate: The Music Of The Doors is perhaps the last time the Doors worked together as group. They helped themselves and the groups of the time to render some of the most popular Doors' songs. Train did their version of Light My Fire here.  The Cult's Ian Astbury is perhaps as close as you can get to modern day Jim Morrison. Ian later joined Ray Manzarek and Robbie Krieger to form The 21st Century Doors. John Densmore and the estates of Jim Morrison protested the formation of the group and they ceased to be with the help from the courts. If there was any wild child who could channel Morrison, it was Ian. This album is an anomaly in The Doors catalog. I personally like the album assembled by producer Ralph Sall. It has a little something for everybody. Less of a tribute album, it is more of an homage of friendly musicians having fun with the three remaining Doors' members.

Die-hard Doors fans have greater reasons to pay attention. The surviving band members appear on several tracks -- sometimes as a backing unit, sometimes as individual guest collaborators -- with frequently vital-sounding results.

Light My Fire by Mavi Işıklar


It is 1969 and another obscure group, Mavi Işıklar, tried to ride the coat tails of the success of Light My Fire a bit too late. The only fire set here by this Turkish group is boredom.

Light My Fire by Episode Six


Before Ian Gillan and Roger Glover revamped Deep Purple they were breaking their chops with a group called Episode Six. After the duo left the group, Episode Six languidly disbanded within 5 years of inaction.  Ian Gillan went on to record Light My Fire in 2014 once again for the album Light My Fire: A Classic Rock Salute to the Doors.

Light My Fire by Surface Tension


Obscure Canadian group Surface Tension barely has barely any tension with their sedated version of Light My Fire in 1967.  What is surprising is that this Winnipeg group is perhaps one of the earliest to cover Light My Fire on record.

Light My Fire by Da Hool


Get the disco ball and let Da Hool loose on the disco floor. This beat drum laced song pounds the most unfaithful version of Light My Fire. Void of any guitar, this song has the charm of Everything But The Girl and a hooded Moby wannabe.